— Day 18 —

For our next day of the weekend, we decided to take things a little slower by going to the Bantry Market after eating our breakfast. Again, we took the bikes to go there. In the market, we found fresh organic fruits and vegetables, amazingly odorous food, cheese, plants, local crafts, clothing, books, pictures and paintings. We had to give ourselves a small amount of money to spend there because we were about to buy everything from the freshly cooked food to the mesmerizing paintings. Instead of buying every little thing we saw, we opted for little paintings, souvenirs and also our lunch for the day. For our lunch, we bought some vegetables, some artisan bread and some cheese.

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https://www.tripadvisor.ca/Attraction_Review-g211922-d8613789-Reviews-Bantry_Market-Bantry_County_Cork.html

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https://www.tripadvisor.ca/Attraction_Review-g211922-d8613789-Reviews-Bantry_Market-Bantry_County_Cork.html

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https://www.tripadvisor.ca/Attraction_Review-g211922-d8613789-Reviews-Bantry_Market-Bantry_County_Cork.html

After we were done shopping, we made our way to the St. Anne’s Church & Shandon Bells Tower. We climbed the stairs that brought us to the bell room, where we were able to ring the bells (that is what the church is famous for). There were many songs that we could play, which was really fun and entertaining.

After we were done with the visit, we walked over to the Cork City Gaol. It was a new one, constructed to replace the old gaol at the Northgate Bridge, in the center of the city, in 1824. During the visit, we learned that in the 1820’s, this prison held male and female prisoners who committed crimes in the city. An interesting fact that we learned was that republican women during the War of Independence and the Civil War were also imprisoned here. Some of these women included the Countess Constance Markievicz. She was the first woman elected in the British Parliament in 1918. Also, we discovered that this prison was, for a while, a women’s prison (since 1878). Back then,it was called the Women’s Gaol. In August 1923, it closed and all of the prisoners were either transferred or released. We were really intrigued by how this dark and old prison made us feel. Everything felt so full of stories; it transported us back in time. When we got out, it was already pretty late. So, we took our bikes and went back to the farm, where amazing people and a delicious supper were waiting for us. Everything we did that day was pretty relaxing, but very interesting. The amazement and admiration that followed us throughout the day made it pass by very fast.

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Information:

http://www.shandonbells.ie/

https://www.tripadvisor.ca/Attraction_Review-g186600-d214825-Reviews-St_Anne_s_Church-Cork_County_Cork.html

http://www.discoverireland.ie/Arts-Culture-Heritage/shandon-church-and-bells-church-of-st-anne/50261

http://www.chooseireland.com/cork/st-annes-church-cork-city/

http://corkcitygaol.com/

http://corkcitygaol.com/about/history/

http://www.lonelyplanet.com/ireland/county-cork/cork-city/sights/museums-galleries/cork-city-gaol

https://www.tripadvisor.ca/Attraction_Review-g186600-d214819-Reviews-Cork_City_Gaol-Cork_County_Cork.html

http://www.buseireann.ie/

https://www.google.ca/maps

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